Caring For Seniors ME

Promises Promises

SHS ME January 2017 NewsletterPromises Promises…

It’s no surprise to many of us that, year after year, the number one New Year’s Resolution is…

(drum roll please…)

  1. Lose Weight and Get Fit

It’s the most common New Year’s resolutions. After a season of way too many cookies, candies and holiday parties, it’s only natural that a vow to lose weight and get fit would follow. Each January, fitness clubs offer deals and promotions to those who want to make good on their resolutions only to find the participation level dwindle starting as early as February. continue reading

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Thanksgiving…a wonderful time to reminisce with seniors!

reminising with seniorsWe all love to talk about “the good old days” and so do our senior loved ones. Of course, we can also argue about whose good old days were better.

To reminisce is a great way for all seniors, recalling memories from a distant past; especially those affected by Dementia.

You can reminisce in an informal way through storytelling, questions and answers or triggering the story by starting it yourself and letting your senior loved one finish it in whatever way he or she remembers it.

You can also reminisce in a more formal way through capturing via video or writing or by having a professional capture the moments. Your senior’s memories should come naturally and flow from them without forcing. continue reading

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Things Come In Threes

remembering David Dionne

I briefly looked in to the saying “things come in threes.” It is a phrase we go to when something is out of the ordinary, everyday routine of life. We often say this with a bit of fear and trembling if we are early in the set of three, or with a sense of “see, I knew it” if we are on the far side of the triple whammy. I looked at Wikipedia and at English Language and Usage on Stack Exchange to see how old the saying is and if there is any truth in it. Wikipedia had many flags of caution so I moved on and found the following on Stack Exchange: continue reading

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We are Seniors

We are Seniors and We are Strongwe are strong
The Boomer Generation is unlike any generation before it. We are blessed with both the opportunity and the challenges of living longer and with greater choices. Thomas Hobbs in the 1600s was famous for his quote “Life is brutish and short.” And so it was in that day. In 1600, the average life could expect to live 30-35 years.  Compare that to today where two thirds (2/3) of all the people that ever lived past the age of 65 in the entire history of the world are present today! By 2020, we will have reached 1 Billion over the age of 60.
What we saw coming, but never though it would come so fast (at least for me) is that the last of the “Baby Boomers” are now entering 50 years of age. Currently, 10,000 people are turning 65 every day. And, for the first time, those who are 65 years old outnumber children 15 years old and younger! continue reading

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Combating the Fear of Falling

Combating the Fear of Falling

By Judy Loubier

Combating the Fear of Falling

Combating the Fear of Falling

Judy Loubier, owner of Seniors Helping Seniors NH, joined us this morning for our Caring for Seniors segment.  She shared about gentle ways to help the senior who is afraid of falling from letting that fear overtake their mobility.

Click the play button above!  Learn how to make a real difference during a difficult time!

 

 Caring for Seniors

Combating the Fear of Falling

Caring For Seniors Radio Program

When:  Wednesday mornings at 7:40 Anchor:  Judy Loubier Sponsor:  Seniors Helping Seniors Southern NH & ME.  Browse the Caring for Seniors show archives. Caring for Seniors covers senior care topics such as Alzheimer’s care, respite care, how to choose senior services, tips on fall prevention, Medicare, Medicaid, estate planning, ins and outs of advance directives, senior fitness tips, stroke prevention, dementia care and recognizing signs of stroke. continue reading

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July is National Sandwich Generation Month

Judy's mom and daughter 1990I am 53 and my go-to sandwich is a good old fashioned peanut butter and jelly sandwich. I know some folks my age would claim bologna and cheese. I can recall a few spam sandwiches at the camp in Maine. There is something intriguing, if not gross, when you have to take your lunchmeat out of a can and pass it through a grinder which is why, I am sure, we were willing to eat that stuff.
But I am not referring to the various trends in sandwich meat over the decades. No, I am talking about the phenomena related to caring for family members who are on both ends of the age spectrum. This is a relatively new term, first coined in 1981 and entered into the Merriam Webster Dictionary in 2006. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sandwich%20generation
Once characterized by folks in their 30s and 40s, this trend has moved from predominantly Baby Boomers and now is strongly represented by Generation Xers. Due to extended life expectancy, delayed parenting, and increased need for both parents to work while raising a family, 47% of adults aged 40-60 fit this description. 80% work and many of these people will have their job impacted by the increased demand of caregiving, resulting in lost wages, reduction of work hours, and at times, loss of employment. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2013/01/30/the-sandwich-generation/
I am a Baby Boomer and now am part of the “Club Sandwich” generation. No kidding. That is an actual term, though it has not yet been picked up by Merriam Webster. Like many Baby Boomers, I am now a grandparent. The Club Sandwich generation describes those of us who are still supporting, in some fashion, our own children, while also providing support to our parents, and now have become grandparents. I officially made the “Club Sandwich” club this year on June 2nd and I am loving it! http://www.sandwichgeneration.com/
But being in the sandwich generation isn’t easy. Part and parcel with this definition is the concept of providing care. Providing care to multiple generations. Usually in unchartered territory. As we navigate caring for aging parents we are often caught unaware, reacting to circumstances in which we feel alone. And even more so because while we sit in the emergency room from 7 pm to 1 am, our children are elsewhere, likely needing us for something, if only to tuck them into bed.
It seems too, that because the care we are providing is for our parents, the very people who cared for us and then happily (or unhappily) lived on their own, something seems out of sorts. Because these are grown-ups who need help it seems that it is not talked about and support is more difficult to find. Everyone at work expects to see less of us after having a baby. Few understand that it could be our parents who take us from work, from sports activities, from social time with friends because there are no free minutes in the day, week, or month.
The risks are well documented. The “sandwichers” are more likely to get sick if we are without support. But this same group will report higher levels of happiness if they do seek help. Still able to provide care when needed, given regular and reliable assistance, the sandwich generation will express a love for the family member who needed help that is deepened and richer than previous felt. And most say, although it was the hardest thing they ever did, they would not have it any other way.
With life expectancy rising and the first of the baby boomers approaching 70, we have not yet seen the full impact of this phenomena to society. Being prepared and finding a way to reap the full benefit of the joy associated with caring for our loved ones means first understanding that you cannot go it alone. continue reading

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Help For The Sandwich Generation

Help For The Sandwich Generation

By Judy Loubier

Help For The Sandwich Generation

Help For The Sandwich Generation

Judy Loubier, owner of Seniors Helping Seniors NH, joined us this morning for our Caring for Seniors segment.  She shared about gentle ways to help the Sandwich Generation.

Judy started off by telling us why she was recently absent from the show.  She also told us about the Sandwich Generation.  Click the play button above!  Learn how to make a real difference during a difficult time!

 

 Caring for Seniors

Home Health CareWhen:  Wednesday mornings at 7:40 Anchor:  Judy Loubier Sponsor: 

Seniors Helping Seniors Southern NH & ME.  continue reading

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Alzheimer’s patients literally go back in time

Alzheimer’s patients literally go back in time

By Judy Loubier

Caring for Seniors with Judy Loubier.  You won’t want to miss this one!

Alzheimer’s patients literally go back in time

Judy Loubier, Alzheimer’s patients literally go back in time

Judy Loubier, owner of Seniors Helping Seniors, joins us for Caring for Seniors to help us understand the challenges of caring for a loved one suffering from dementia.  She offers useful tips on subjects ranging from basic communicating to learning how to help seniors feel more comfortable in daily activities.

In this segment, we we learned how important it is to discover the afflicted’s past experiences as a way to help with some of the challenging behavior associated with this condition.  The disconnect between current reality and past history, which becomes reality for the patient, often confuses and surprises family and friends.  Loubier says it’s a treasurable opportunity to discover a time in your parent’s life about which you would otherwise probably not know. continue reading

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Deciphering the Mystery of Dementia with Judy Loubier

Deciphering the Mystery of Dementia

 Deciphering the Mystery of Dementia

Caring For Seniors Radio Broadcast With Judy Loubier

Judy Loubier covers the all important topic of understanding dementia in your loved one.  Early signs.  What to look for.  What is the difference between normal memory loss and dementia?  And, she gives us tips to keep our brains in tip-top shape!

She also tells us more about Seniors Helping Seniors, a program designed to ease the burden of elders who are living independently.

 Caring for Seniors

Home Health CareWhen:  Wednesday mornings at 7:40 Anchor:  Judy Loubier Sponsor: 

Seniors Helping Seniors Seacoast & Southern NH continue reading

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CRASH B and Family Support

C.R.A.S.H B. and Family Support

rowing seniors

Sunday March 1st 2015 was my first experience with the World Indoor Rowing Championships. You may know from a previous blog that I am a member of a master’s crew team. We are masters not in ability but in age. Apparently after a certain age which will not be disclosed here, you are considered a master.

The World Indoor Rowing Championships is better known in rowing circles as the “Crash Bs.” Just a side note here, in our home it has been referred to as the “Groovy Bs” as back in the days of prep school my husband’s first introduction to a fellow preppy was something like “My name is Bruce but call me Groovy B.” continue reading

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